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Developing Dartmouth’s First “Intro. to Digital Humanities” Course: Syllabi and Resources

This winter, I was selected to develop and teach Dartmouth College’s first undergraduate “Introduction to Digital Humanities” course, to be called “The Humanist in the Computer: Literature, Art, and Technology” (the course name was pre-selected). It will be offered by the Comparative Literature Department in 2016-17. I have been teaching English literature courses steeped in DH methodologies and practices since 2009, but this is my first opportunity to build and teach a DH course as such, and it will also be a milestone course for the college. I polled a number of DH colleagues on social media (Facebook and Twitter) who I know have…

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The Digital Humanities for Lunch, with the Stainforth Team – 11/16, noon, M210 Norlin Library, CU-Boulder

Please join us! The Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing project team will be holding a brown-bag lunch on Monday, November 16th, at noon, in Norlin M210. We are a digital humanities group building an electronic edition of Francis Stainforth’s 19th-century private library–the largest private library of women’s writing in the 19th century. This is a great time to chat and ask questions about the digital humanities in general as well specifics about how this very large-scale textual digitization project is progressing. We will also discuss our progress thanks to the Innovative Seed Grant funding that we won for 2015-16. The Stainforth project…

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C9 Potter (Miss) Poetry from Nature [1789]

[Reposted from the Stainforth project blog.] We have for a few weeks now had all of our edited transcription files combined in one master Google Sheet instead of in 509 separate Google Sheets. This has enabled all kinds of editorial work necessary to parse our transcriptions in our database. But it also enables us to do fun things like start to search across Stainforth’s entire library–at the moment, 12,036 rows of data and growing due to his tendency to list multiple editions on a single line–for topics, themes, and keywords in titles. I was interested in seeing how many titles…

Stopping to Smell Stainforth’s Library Catalog Data Points

I always want to blog about the Stainforth Library authors and works I come across while transcribing, editing data, or encoding, and yet I have a very hard time stopping what I’m doing to actually do this–that is, to share the non-canonical authors that we find during our work, and even the canonical authors that I haven’t studied because they lie outside of my mid-18 to mid-19c zone of expertise. Yet creating awareness of these authors and their texts and making the texts available are some of the primary motivators of this project. When it is something I consider so…

New Appointment: Associated Postdoctoral Fellow of the Gender Research Institute at Dartmouth (GRID)

Yesterday I was invited to be an Associated Postdoctoral Fellow of the Gender Research Institute at Dartmouth (GRID). I’m over the moon about this, since I will be collaborating regularly with an impressive group of GRID Fellows that include faculty and postdocs across many disciplines studying gender and working to change perceptions of gender and related identity constructions in the past and present. (This appointment is in addition to my primary position as Postdoctoral Fellow in the Neukom Institute. I will still be housed in the English department.) Read more about Dartmouth’s Gender Research Institute here. This opportunity has a…

DH Project Milestone: Completed Transcription and Editing of Library Catalog

Today we’re celebrating a project milestone: the team completed the transcription and editing for all of the pages (1-507) of Stainforth’s library catalog manuscript. We began transcribing the library catalog manuscript in January of 2014. After finishing the transcription in the fall/winter of 2014, we began editing all of the transcribed data in early March of this year and haven’t stopped to catch our breath. Six months later, and after several adjustments in methodology that improved our workflow and accuracy, we can check off this monumental effort to have edited transcriptions of Stainforth’s library holdings. Huzzah! The editors include (in…

Report on my BARS 2015 “Apocalypse and Ruination” panel (chaired by Diane Piccitto)

[Reposted from the BARS blog, by Lucy Johnson, original post found here] The 2015 British Association for Romantic Studies International Conference was held in Cardiff this July.  Entitled Romantic Imprints, the conference boasted an extraordinary array of interdisciplinary and wide-ranging scholarship on various facets of Romanticism, and delegates were greeted with a feast of ideas from which to choose.  I was lucky enough to attend a number of incredibly interesting and thought-provoking panels, and it is space alone that requires me to limit this report to two panels in particular. The 1:45 PM Thursday panel I attended was Apocalypse and…

Will Deliver Annual Whalley Lecture at Queens University, Spring 2016

I’m delighted to announce that I will deliver the annual Whalley Lecture at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, on March 11, 2016. The Whalley Lecture honors the late Dr. George Whalley, former Head of Queen’s Department of English (1962–1967, 1977–1982), Romanticist, man of letters, and decorated veteran (http://georgewhalley.ca/gwp/). The Whalley Lecture is the English Department’s capstone lecture in the year-long series of guest speakers.