Upcoming Speaking Engagements 2016-17

I have a number of invited talks, lectures, and roundtables already scheduled for 2016-17. 23-25 October 2016: I will deliver an invited talk on creating Dartmouth’s first undergraduate “Introduction to Digital Humanities” course, Queen’s University, Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium. Read the abstract. Spring 2017, date TBD: I have been invited to deliver a lecture for the University of Colorado Boulder’s Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series. I will present on the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, the DH project I direct. 21-24 June 2017: I will organize/chair and present on a roundtable called “Digital Generations of 18th- and 19th-century British Women Writers” for the 25th…

twitter-banner_08-31-16

BWWC 2017 Roundtable CFP: Digital Generations of 18th- and 19th-c. British Women Writers

I’ve been invited to organize a roundtable on digital scholarship at the upcoming 25th Anniversary British Women Writers Conference, to be held at UNC-Chapel Hill, June 22-25, 2017. Here is the CFP – please send me your abstracts or your questions by Jan. 15, 2017. Digital Generations of 18th- and 19th-century British Women Writers The history of using computers to study 18th- and 19th-century British women writers is at least 30 years old and has been overshadowed by attention to the William Blake and Dante Gabriel Rossetti Archives. In 1987, J. F. Burrows published his seminal text-analysis book project on dialogue in Austen’s…

Abstract, Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium

I am excited to be talking about the process of crafting an undergraduate “Introduction to Digital Humanities” syllabus at the upcoming Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium at Queen’s University (Kingston, ON), October 23-25. Here’s my proposal: Writing an “Introduction to Digital Humanities” Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too! Stephen Ramsay’s seminal essay “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around” argues that we can study a culture with too many texts to read by “browsing” according to our interests, or more colloquially, by “screwing around” and embracing serendipitous experiential learning. Teachers frequently assign this essay to encourage undergraduates to approach Digital Humanities course…

NASSR 2016 Slides.001

“Romantic Women Writers and The Stainforth Library: ‘Making Women Writers Count'” (NASSR 2016)

[I delivered this talk on the “Panelists, Collectors, Archivists” panel on Thursday, August 11, 2016, at NASSR. Thanks to my co-panelists Lauren Gillingham, Thomas McLean, and Marc Mazur, to our moderator Eric Gidal, and to those who made Q&A a useful and energetic discussion to kick off the conference. I hope you will respond with questions or comments.] Francis John Stainforth (1797 – 1866) was a British Anglican priest, a bibliophile, and a collector’s collector of shells, stamps, and most of all, books. He owned what we have so far found to be the largest private library of Anglophone women’s…

6/7 Workshop: “Wikipedagogy: Incorporating Wikipedia Editing into Your Teaching”

On Tuesday June 7, I am co-organizing, with Laura Braunstein, a one-day workshop on how to teach using Wikipedia. Our guest expert Amanda Rust, Assistant Director of the Digital Scholarship Group and Digital Humanities Librarian, Northeastern University, will lead the workshop. 9am-noon:  Introduction; theory and practice of Wikipedia editing (DCAL) Noon-1pm: Lunch (DCAL) 1-4pm: Hands-on editing practicum (Carson 61) Sign up using this link: http://libcal.dartmouth.edu/event/2594080 This workshop will introduce Wikipedia editing as a pedagogical practice that offers students the chance to participate in a live, collaborative, and globally relevant digital humanities project (en.Wikipedia.org and other Wikimedia projects) and to write and edit content…

RA Interviews: Experiential Learning and The Stainforth Project

Because I have been so lucky to employ fantastic researchers here at Dartmouth and at CU-Boulder to work on the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, Dartmouth’s Digital Humanities librarians asked me to present on experiential learning in DH. As a doctoral student, I was also paid to work on a professor’s DH projects that were underway: Laura Mandell’s Poetess Archive and The Letters of Robert Bloomfield. While I can talk about being project director and setting up the infrastructure for experiential learning, details about the outcomes of experiential learning are best gleaned from our researchers, past and present, in their…

Suricates,_Namibia-2

Tomorrow, 5pm: Experiential Learning with Digital Humanities

Dartmouth’s Digital Seminar this month will feature Ivy Schweitzer, Professor of English, and Kirstyn Leuner, Neukom Postdoctoral Fellow, discussing Digital Humanities and experiential learning. The conversation will be moderated by Ashley Kehoe, Director of DCAL’s Experiential Learning Initiative, and will focus on strategies for using DH tools and methods to promote active learning in the classroom and working with student assistants on DH projects. Kirstyn will be talking about her experience as the Director of the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing DH project working with paid student assistants. She will also talk about her own experience as a graduate student RA…

Leuner Whalley Poster

“Whither Are We Bound: Romanticism in the Digital Age,” 2016 Whalley Lecture (Queen’s U)

[I delivered the Annual Whalley Lecture on March 11, 2016, at Queen’s University. All the links I mentioned in my talk can be found here in order of mention. Once more, I would like to thank Shelley King, Brooke Cameron, John Pierce, and the entire Queen’s English Department for this opportunity and a wonderful visit.] You may recognize the first part of my title since the Open Syllabus Project tells us that Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein appears on more syllabi than any other work of English literature. For those who may not recall Frankenstein, it begins with Captain Walton’s sea voyage…