“How Anne B. Poyntz Lost Her Je ne sçai quoi (1769) to a Patron, a Printer’s Reader, & Google Books” – Technologies of Print Symposium 2.19.21

Here are the slides for my talk, “How Anne B. Poyntz Lost Her Je ne sçai quoi (1769) to a Patron, a Printer’s Reader, & Google Books,” delivered at the Technologies of Print Symposium: Geographies of Meaning on 19 February 2021. I have also included a few additional links for reference. Thank you to the following people for your assistance with this project-in-progress: John Boneham (British Library), Paul Conway (U Michigan), Chad Johnson (SFCB) and Mary Risala Laird (SFCB), Danna D’Esopo (SCU ’20), Michelle Burnham (SCU), Katherine D. Harris (SJSU), Shaun O’Dell (SJSU) The Technologies of Print Symposium: Geographies of…

“World Peace in Five Easy Steps”: Teaching Freire with a Collaborative Spotify Playlist, with Rhiannon Giddens

On Tuesday January 19th, our Fall term “Women’s Prison Writing” class had the privilege of making a Spotify playlist with SCU’s Frank Sinatra Artist-in-Residence Rhiannon Giddens. Specifically, we made a playlist to express and teach others about Paulo Freire’s concept of dialogue that he writes about in chapter 3 of Pedagogy of the Oppressed. The idea is that making a playlist will reinforce for students that they understand the five parts of dialogue and have considered how to convey them to others in a persuasive and memorable way, effectively sharing that knowledge with a public audience on Spotify. In theory,…

MLA 2021, “Recovery, Identity, and WikiData: What Literary Scholars Need to Know,” Panel

On Friday 8 January 2021, I joined three colleagues on a panel organized by my co-editor and colleague Deborah Hollis, head of Special Collections at University Libraries, University of Colorado Boulder. Speakers on our panel include, clockwise from the upper left, Chris Long (CU Libraries), myself, Deborah Hollis (CU Libraries), and Danna D’Esopo (SCU class of 20). Our panel examined a history of our DH project The Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing as it relates to a specific kind of recovery scholarship to create, edit, and share authority records for lesser-known women writers. We addressed authority records created specifically for…

“Why Do Academic Writing? and How to Get It Done” invited lecture for Auburn Univ. at Montgomery

On Friday, October 30, I delivered an invited virtual lecture to the Auburn University at Montgomery campus with the goal of inspiring faculty to invest their time in disciplinary scholarship both for personal and professional reward. My audience included faculty and graduate students in the College of Nursing and Health Sciences and from across the University. I share my slides below. I had a blast delivering this 40-minute presentation followed by Q&A about research and academic writing. Scholarship is a favorite part of my job.

BWWC 2020 (TCU), co-presenting with Danna D’Esopo (’20)

From College Notes, March 27, 2020: “On March 6, Kirstyn Leuner (English) and Danna D’Esopo ’20 (English) co-presented their paper, “By A Woman, in Red: Anne B. Poyntz and the Blush of the Page,” at the 28th annual British Women Writers Conference, held at Texas Christian University. Their paper argued that Poyntz begins her book of letters and poems, Je ne sçai quoi (1769), with a dedication printed in red ink in order to make her book appear to blush. The blush is, on the surface, the customary apology that all 18th-century women writers were expected to make for their published writing. But Leuner and D’Esopo…

Flat-Back Case Binding Workshop SFCB (Core 2)

On Sunday, I spent the day at the San Francisco Center for the Book learning how to make a flat-back case binding with our instructor Nina Eve Zeininger. I bought myself this workshop as a birthday present, so I was eager to cash it in even at the loss of a Sunday outside on my mountain bike. This class is the sequel to Core 1, coptic binding, that I took last May and blogged about here. I must say that I did not succeed in taking as detailed notes during this class because it moved faster (presuming we remember Core…

Printing Sassy Valentines with Letterpress Puns

Tuesday, February 11, the Digital Humanities Working Group hosted a Sassy Valentines Card making party, open to all SCU students and the public, in Dowd 306, from 3-5pm. We were proud to offer 2 designs to print because our core group of trained printers is growing! We had a steady stream of visitors at the event from start to finish, including staff, faculty, and their family members; undergraduates and graduate students; and community members. There was also some press buzz at the event, with Katrina Rudd posting updates in an Instagram story (expires after 24 hrs) on @santaclarauniversity. For this…

Slow Tech @ #MLA20, “The Letterpress Studio as Campus Maker Space” #s683

This MLA 2020 roundtable “The Letterpress Studio as Campus Maker Space” features the following speakers Ryan Cordell Northeastern U Emilie Hardman Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. Kirstyn Leuner Santa Clara U Andrew Rippeon Davidson C Kurt M. Koenigsberger Case Western Reserve U Andrew Griffin U of California, Santa Barbara Britt Starr U of Maryland, College Park Jonathan Senchyne – Respondant, U of Wisconsin, Madison The title of my talk is “Slow Tech in Silicon Valley” At Santa Clara University, our press does not have an official mission statement or slogan. But the philosophy that I argue best serves SCU’s letterpress program…

The Stainforth Library, Project Development Recap 2018-19

[Reader, a warning: this is a very long document, but it must be long in order to quantify and narrativize the different kinds of digital scholarship added to The Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing this year and why it matters to the project. My hope is that by continuing to take the time to blog DH scholarship processes, I can help draw attention to the work involved and the disciplinary expertise that is the difference between DH scholarship and non-scholarly data editing or website management.] What did we accomplish this year in The Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing https://stainforth.scu.edu? Academic…

Bringing Letterpress to SCU

Bringing letterpress to SCU required the collaboration of faculty across institutions, between departments and administrators in the College of Arts and Sciences, and most important, between Humanists within and outside the Academy. Since 2016, faculty at Santa Clara have been dreaming of bringing book arts and letterpress to the campus as part of a greater “maker space.” A happy opportunity arose in 2017, when Professor Katherine D. Harris (SJSU) connected me with Tom Davis, a local printer who wished to donate the press and studio in his home to an educational institution. New to SCU but sensing an opportunity, I…