6/7 Workshop: “Wikipedagogy: Incorporating Wikipedia Editing into Your Teaching”

On June 7, I am co-organizing, with Laura Braunstein, a one-day workshop on how to teach using Wikipedia. Our guest expert Amanda Rust, Assistant Director of the Digital Scholarship Group and Digital Humanities Librarian, Northeastern University, will lead the workshop. 9am-noon:  Introduction; theory and practice of Wikipedia editing (DCAL) Noon-1pm: Lunch (DCAL) 1-4pm: Hands-on editing practicum (Carson 61) This workshop will introduce Wikipedia editing as a pedagogical practice that offers students the chance to participate in a live, collaborative, and globally relevant digital humanities project (en.Wikipedia.org and other Wikimedia projects) and to write and edit content for a public audience of various…

RA Interviews: Experiential Learning and The Stainforth Project

Because I have been so lucky to employ fantastic researchers here at Dartmouth and at CU-Boulder to work on the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, Dartmouth’s Digital Humanities librarians asked me to present on experiential learning in DH. As a doctoral student, I was also paid to work on a professor’s DH projects that were underway: Laura Mandell’s Poetess Archive and The Letters of Robert Bloomfield. While I can talk about being project director and setting up the infrastructure for experiential learning, details about the outcomes of experiential learning are best gleaned from our researchers, past and present, in their…

Suricates,_Namibia-2

Tomorrow, 5pm: Experiential Learning with Digital Humanities

Dartmouth’s Digital Seminar this month will feature Ivy Schweitzer, Professor of English, and Kirstyn Leuner, Neukom Postdoctoral Fellow, discussing Digital Humanities and experiential learning. The conversation will be moderated by Ashley Kehoe, Director of DCAL’s Experiential Learning Initiative, and will focus on strategies for using DH tools and methods to promote active learning in the classroom and working with student assistants on DH projects. Kirstyn will be talking about her experience as the Director of the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing DH project working with paid student assistants. She will also talk about her own experience as a graduate student RA…

Leuner Whalley Poster

“Whither Are We Bound: Romanticism in the Digital Age,” 2016 Whalley Lecture (Queen’s U)

[I delivered the Annual Whalley Lecture on March 11, 2016, at Queen’s University. All the links I mentioned in my talk can be found here in order of mention. Once more, I would like to thank Shelley King, Brooke Cameron, John Pierce, and the entire Queen’s English Department for this opportunity and a wonderful visit.] You may recognize the first part of my title since the Open Syllabus Project tells us that Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein appears on more syllabi than any other work of English literature. For those who may not recall Frankenstein, it begins with Captain Walton’s sea voyage…

Whalley Lecture Links

Please use this list of links to follow along with, click through, or explore sites I mention during my lecture this afternoon. They are listed in the order in which I mention them. Open Syllabus Project Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing The Orlando Project Women Writers Project The William Blake Archive The Bluestocking Archive The Shelley-Godwin Archive Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive Romantic Circles Frankenstein (RC Electronic Edition) The Poetess Archive The Amelia Anderson Opie Archive NINES 18thConnect Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net (RaVoN) Forget Me Not: A Hypertextual Archive Irish Women Poets of the Romantic Period…

Leuner Whalley Poster

Delivering the Annual Whalley Lecture, 3/11/16, Queen’s University

Next Friday, March 11, I will be at Queen’s University to deliver the Annual Whalley Lecture: “Whither Are We Bound: Romanticism in the Digital Age.” My talk will explore literary experimentation in the Romantic era as well as in Romantic digital humanities projects. I am really looking forward to this event! (poster credit: Brooke Cameron)

Intro. to DH Syllabus Draft

A few weeks ago I posted a summary of a conversation that I started on Facebook and Twitter regarding favorite syllabi or resources for building an introduction to Digital Humanities syllabus. Here’s the post. Below is the syllabus draft that I just submitted for feedback that uses many of the elements I found useful from the syllabi or suggestions in that post, so thank you to all contributors. You’ll notice that we’re on the quarter system at Dartmouth, so our terms are very short and only allow for 9-10 weeks of material. There are modules I would like to add…

Diorama Poster

Upcoming Public Lecture 2/18/16, “The Textual Diorama in the Romantic Era: Writing Virtual Ruins”

In 1822-23, a large-scale, theatrical painting show called the Diorama, invented by Louis Daguerre and Charles Bouton, debuted in Paris and London, and it riveted audiences with the recent inventions of realistic 3D illusions and animation. The sensational Diorama inspired authors and artists to invent new forms of storytelling. Building on an emerging body of critical theory and analysis that grapples with non-teleological histories of “old” media, Dr. Leuner identifies a group of authors in the early 19th century who respond to the novelty and special effects of the Diorama by trying to translate these shows into text to enliven…