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Syllabus “The Humanist in the Computer: Digital Humanities and Social Justice” COLT 18.02 (Winter 17)

Dr. Kirstyn Leuner (kirstyn.j.leuner@dartmouth.edu) New 17 Winter Course: COLT 18.02 Meets at 10A (Tues/Thurs 10:10-12:00) Office hours: TBD in Sanborn 014 The Humanist in the Computer: Digital Humanities and Social Justice Short Description: What can digital technologies do to our words? What can they do for our words, as activism? In this course, we will use computers to create, share, and analyze different kinds of digital texts in order to discover together—through, reading, writing, and entry-level programming—how our use of these technologies changes our relationship to language and politics. Desires to think, experiment, and collaborate are required; programming experience is…

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Romantic Circles Pedagogies Advisory Board, Ideas for Teaching w/RC Texts and Technologies

I was recently appointed to Romantic Circles’ new Pedagogies Advisory Board, a group of Romanticist digital humanists led by Kate Singer (Mt. Holyoke) and David Ruderman (OSU). The rest of our team includes Andrew Burkett (Union), Lindsey Eckert (Georgia State), myself, and Roger Whitson (WSU). We held our first Google Hangout this week to brainstorm ways to invigorate the content on the RC Pedagogies site. The Hangout was the highlight of my day, not only because I had the rare opportunity to see and chat with Romanticist colleagues I respect and adore and usually only see once or twice a…

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Talk on Student-Centered Course Design in Digital Humanities Surveys for Undergrads (Matariki DH Colloquium)

I delivered this talk at the Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium, 23-25 October 2016, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario). Writing an “Introduction to Digital Humanities” Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too! Many a Digital Humanities syllabus begins with an essay by Stephen Ramsay called “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; or, What You Do With A Million Books.” I do this, too! The essay argues that we can study a culture with too many texts to read by “browsing” according to our interests and embracing serendipitous experiential learning, as if we’re wandering in the library stacks. Ramsay calls this “screwing around” or…

Links for Matariki Colloquium Talk on Teaching Digital Humanities to Undergraduates

Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium, 23-25 October 2016, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario). Here are the links that I will mention, in order, either verbally or on slides in my talk, “Writing an ‘Introduction to Digital Humanities’ Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too!” In my talk, I suggest that we can use Stephen Ramsay’s essay “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; Or What You Do With A Million Books” to help those designing undergraduate surveys of the expansive and still-expanding field of Digital Humanities. I argue that we can organize DH surveys and make them meaningful to an undergraduate audience by connecting disparate…

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Featured in Library Exhibit “Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice”

An excerpt from my Winter syllabus appears in the library exhibit “Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: A Community of Practice.” The exhibit opened August 1 and ends today, so it’s the last day to visit these posters in the Baker Library workspace. I especially appreciate that I share this poster with my Neukom mentor at Dartmouth, Ivy Schweitzer, because together we have embraced this idea of a DH community of practice in our collaborations with each other as well as with the greater Dartmouth DH collective. Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice What is digital humanities? It is a community of practice at…

Upcoming Speaking Engagements 2016-17

I have a number of invited talks, lectures, and roundtables already scheduled for 2016-17. 23-25 October 2016: I will deliver an invited talk on creating Dartmouth’s first undergraduate “Introduction to Digital Humanities” course, Queen’s University, Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium. Read the abstract. Spring 2017, date TBD: I have been invited to deliver a lecture for the University of Colorado Boulder’s Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series. I will present on the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, the DH project I direct. 21-24 June 2017: I will organize/chair and present on a roundtable called “Digital Generations of 18th- and 19th-century British Women Writers” for the 25th…

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BWWC 2017 Roundtable CFP: Digital Generations of 18th- and 19th-c. British Women Writers

I’ve been invited to organize a roundtable on digital scholarship at the upcoming 25th Anniversary British Women Writers Conference, to be held at UNC-Chapel Hill, June 22-25, 2017. Here is the CFP – please send me your abstracts or your questions by Jan. 15, 2017. Digital Generations of 18th- and 19th-century British Women Writers The history of using computers to study 18th- and 19th-century British women writers is at least 30 years old and has been overshadowed by attention to the William Blake and Dante Gabriel Rossetti Archives. In 1987, J. F. Burrows published his seminal text-analysis book project on dialogue in Austen’s…

Abstract, Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium

I am excited to be talking about the process of crafting an undergraduate “Introduction to Digital Humanities” syllabus at the upcoming Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium at Queen’s University (Kingston, ON), October 23-25. Here’s my proposal: Writing an “Introduction to Digital Humanities” Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too! Stephen Ramsay’s seminal essay “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around” argues that we can study a culture with too many texts to read by “browsing” according to our interests, or more colloquially, by “screwing around” and embracing serendipitous experiential learning. Teachers frequently assign this essay to encourage undergraduates to approach Digital Humanities course…

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“Romantic Women Writers and The Stainforth Library: ‘Making Women Writers Count'” (NASSR 2016)

[I delivered this talk on the “Panelists, Collectors, Archivists” panel on Thursday, August 11, 2016, at NASSR. Thanks to my co-panelists Lauren Gillingham, Thomas McLean, and Marc Mazur, to our moderator Eric Gidal, and to those who made Q&A a useful and energetic discussion to kick off the conference. I hope you will respond with questions or comments.] Francis John Stainforth (1797 – 1866) was a British Anglican priest, a bibliophile, and a collector’s collector of shells, stamps, and most of all, books. He owned what we have so far found to be the largest private library of Anglophone women’s…