Vignette: Baths of Bagnole; or the juvenile miscellany

“K1 Baths of Bagnole (The) 1826” (28.06) – I don’t recall what drew me to this entry, but I wound up researching it for long enough to figure out that it’s difficult to find. I wonder why the “Baths of Bagnole” would be the title or subject for a juvenile miscellany? Stainforth lists this title twice in his catalog: the first is the entry I quoted above, and the second is the same but for the addition of the author’s initials, E. T. W., and it does not give a shelfmark. It seems like his first entry, without the author listed, is missing a “See” reference pointing to the entry under W (E. T.) on page 472.

Google Books has a stub for this title, no e-book available, but a short caption: “An English family takes a trip to France for the health of the oldest son.”

Worldcat has an entry for this title, and four libraries have a physical copy of the book (Toronto Public Library, UFL, U of Glasgow, and U of St. Andrews in Scotland), and the other two libraries have microform editions. I was disappointed not to find a digital copy I could dig up online. The book was published in London by Charles Frederick Cock in 1826. The announcement for the book’s publication in The Quarterly Review (June & Sept 1826) tells us that the book is an 18mo. and cost 3s. The London Literary Gazette gives a small snippet description that the publisher includes in an advertisement for another title, Karmath, an Arabian Tale, by Edward Upham:

The BATHS of BAGNOLE, or the Juvenile Miscellany, with 3 pretty Lithographic Views. Royal 18mo. half bound, price 3s. ‘A pleasant little story-book for Children, inculcating moral duties and good feelings in an agreeable manner, and interspersed with stories gathered in Travelling on the Continent.’ —Literary Gazette

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s