Undergraduates in the Archives at SCU

On June 7, 2018, the students of three Spring term classes presented collaborative book and digital exhibits in Special Collections and Archives at Santa Clara University. For their part, my students in ENG 144G, “18th-century British Women’s Writing,” curated an exhibit celebrating the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818).  Students wrote an introduction to our exhibit, short essays about each book, captions for each item, and reflections. Visit our digital exhibit here: https://scufrankenstein.omeka.net/. Our course foregrounded questions of what it means for women writers to be canonical, who is solidly in the canon, and perceiving the long continuum…

Siobhan Senier @ SCU: Decolonizing archives, Dawnlandvoices.org

Grateful to have Siobhan Senier at SCU today talking about decolonizing archives, Dawnlandvoices.org, Native American writing, and Digital Humanities. Her talk is at 4pm, Learning Commons, 3rd Floor Gallery (310). With accompanying Special Collections materials on display, thanks to Nadia Nasr. Thank you to my collaborators Michelle Burnham and Amy Lueck; the Faculty Collaborative for Teaching Innovation; DH Working Group @SCU; University Library; and Departments of English, Ethnic Studies, Art and Art History, and History.

Frankenstein @ 200 Collaboration

Throughout 2018, I will be collaborating with professors Katherine D. Harris (SJSU) and Omar Miranda (USF) to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s publication of Frankenstein (1818). Visit our website to see a list of related events in the Bay Area as well as other resources relating to studying Frankenstein. https://frankenstein200yrs.wordpress.com/ Tweet us or follow us on Twitter: @Frank200yrs Upcoming highlights: 2/28/18, “Frankenstein at the Ballet” lecture by Professor Ellen Peel (SJSU) 5/1/18, “Deep Humanities” 1-day symposium and student poster session, led by Dr. Revathi Krishnaswamy (SJSU) Fall 2018 collaborative rare book exhibits at SCU, SJSU, and USF, with linked electronic captions…

Talk on Student-Centered Course Design in Digital Humanities Surveys for Undergrads (Matariki DH Colloquium)

I delivered this talk at the Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium, 23-25 October 2016, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario). Writing an “Introduction to Digital Humanities” Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too! Many a Digital Humanities syllabus begins with an essay by Stephen Ramsay called “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; or, What You Do With A Million Books.” I do this, too! The essay argues that we can study a culture with too many texts to read by “browsing” according to our interests and embracing serendipitous experiential learning, as if we’re wandering in the library stacks. Ramsay calls this “screwing around” or…

Featured in Library Exhibit “Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice”

An excerpt from my Winter syllabus appears in the library exhibit “Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: A Community of Practice.” The exhibit opened August 1 and ends today, so it’s the last day to visit these posters in the Baker Library workspace. I especially appreciate that I share this poster with my Neukom mentor at Dartmouth, Ivy Schweitzer, because together we have embraced this idea of a DH community of practice in our collaborations with each other as well as with the greater Dartmouth DH collective. Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice What is digital humanities? It is a community of practice at…

“Romantic Women Writers and The Stainforth Library: ‘Making Women Writers Count'” (NASSR 2016)

[I delivered this talk on the “Panelists, Collectors, Archivists” panel on Thursday, August 11, 2016, at NASSR. Thanks to my co-panelists Lauren Gillingham, Thomas McLean, and Marc Mazur, to our moderator Eric Gidal, and to those who made Q&A a useful and energetic discussion to kick off the conference. I hope you will respond with questions or comments.] Francis John Stainforth (1797 – 1866) was a British Anglican priest, a bibliophile, and a collector’s collector of shells, stamps, and most of all, books. He owned what we have so far found to be the largest private library of Anglophone women’s…

6/7 Workshop: “Wikipedagogy: Incorporating Wikipedia Editing into Your Teaching”

On Tuesday June 7, I am co-organizing, with Laura Braunstein, a one-day workshop on how to teach using Wikipedia. Our guest expert Amanda Rust, Assistant Director of the Digital Scholarship Group and Digital Humanities Librarian, Northeastern University, will lead the workshop. 9am-noon:  Introduction; theory and practice of Wikipedia editing (DCAL) Noon-1pm: Lunch (DCAL) 1-4pm: Hands-on editing practicum (Carson 61) Sign up using this link: http://libcal.dartmouth.edu/event/2594080 This workshop will introduce Wikipedia editing as a pedagogical practice that offers students the chance to participate in a live, collaborative, and globally relevant digital humanities project (en.Wikipedia.org and other Wikimedia projects) and to write and edit content…

RA Interviews: Experiential Learning and The Stainforth Project

Because I have been so lucky to employ fantastic researchers here at Dartmouth and at CU-Boulder to work on the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, Dartmouth’s Digital Humanities librarians asked me to present on experiential learning in DH. As a doctoral student, I was also paid to work on a professor’s DH projects that were underway: Laura Mandell’s Poetess Archive and The Letters of Robert Bloomfield. While I can talk about being project director and setting up the infrastructure for experiential learning, details about the outcomes of experiential learning are best gleaned from our researchers, past and present, in their…

“Whither Are We Bound: Romanticism in the Digital Age,” 2016 Whalley Lecture (Queen’s U)

[I delivered the Annual Whalley Lecture on March 11, 2016, at Queen’s University. All the links I mentioned in my talk can be found here in order of mention. Once more, I would like to thank Shelley King, Brooke Cameron, John Pierce, and the entire Queen’s English Department for this opportunity and a wonderful visit.] You may recognize the first part of my title since the Open Syllabus Project tells us that Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein appears on more syllabi than any other work of English literature. For those who may not recall Frankenstein, it begins with Captain Walton’s sea voyage…

Delivering the Annual Whalley Lecture, 3/11/16, Queen’s University

Next Friday, March 11, I will be at Queen’s University to deliver the Annual Whalley Lecture: “Whither Are We Bound: Romanticism in the Digital Age.” My talk will explore literary experimentation in the Romantic era as well as in Romantic digital humanities projects. I am really looking forward to this event! (poster credit: Brooke Cameron)