Guest lecturing @ SJSU, #bigger6 graduate seminar, with activities

Last evening, I had the pleasure of guest lecturing in Prof. Katherine D. Harris’s graduate seminar, “#Bigger6: Decolonizing British Romantic Literature (1775-1835) through Print Culture” (ENGL 232), from 7-8:30pm. My presentation had two parts. First, I gave a 45-minute lecture on the Stainforth library and its potential as #bigger6 activism, or the broadening of the scope of Romanticism beyond the study of the same 6-ish white male writers (John Keats, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, George Gordon Byron, Percy Shelley, William Blake, plus Sir Walter Scott, etc.). After this, I led a 30-minute exploration of DH project planning and management….

Undergraduates in the Archives at SCU

On June 7, 2018, the students of three Spring term classes presented collaborative book and digital exhibits in Special Collections and Archives at Santa Clara University. For their part, my students in ENG 144G, “18th-century British Women’s Writing,” curated an exhibit celebrating the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818).  Students wrote an introduction to our exhibit, short essays about each book, captions for each item, and reflections. Visit our digital exhibit here: https://scufrankenstein.omeka.net/. Our course foregrounded questions of what it means for women writers to be canonical, who is solidly in the canon, and perceiving the long continuum…

Frankenstein @ 200 Collaboration

Throughout 2018, I will be collaborating with professors Katherine D. Harris (SJSU) and Omar Miranda (USF) to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s publication of Frankenstein (1818). Visit our website to see a list of related events in the Bay Area as well as other resources relating to studying Frankenstein. https://frankenstein200yrs.wordpress.com/ Tweet us or follow us on Twitter: @Frank200yrs Upcoming highlights: 2/28/18, “Frankenstein at the Ballet” lecture by Professor Ellen Peel (SJSU) 5/1/18, “Deep Humanities” 1-day symposium and student poster session, led by Dr. Revathi Krishnaswamy (SJSU) Fall 2018 collaborative rare book exhibits at SCU, SJSU, and USF, with linked electronic captions…

Romantic Circles Pedagogies Reading Group, meet 1/25/18 to discuss “The Bride of the Greek Isle” (Hemans)

Romantic Circles Pedagogies is looking to assemble a porous group of scholars at all levels who want to discuss canonical and emerging texts — an open, generous, and collegial community of readers and teachers. Each term, RC Pedagogies will host a virtual reading group on a predetermined text at a set date/time via video-chat on Zoom, an online video-conferencing system (free and easy to use). We envision these events as broadly pedagogical moments for graduate students and established scholars alike who want to increase their own knowledge of the field and/or discover new ways to teach the work. The conversation…

Talk on Student-Centered Course Design in Digital Humanities Surveys for Undergrads (Matariki DH Colloquium)

I delivered this talk at the Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium, 23-25 October 2016, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario). Writing an “Introduction to Digital Humanities” Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too! Many a Digital Humanities syllabus begins with an essay by Stephen Ramsay called “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; or, What You Do With A Million Books.” I do this, too! The essay argues that we can study a culture with too many texts to read by “browsing” according to our interests and embracing serendipitous experiential learning, as if we’re wandering in the library stacks. Ramsay calls this “screwing around” or…

Featured in Library Exhibit “Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice”

An excerpt from my Winter syllabus appears in the library exhibit “Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: A Community of Practice.” The exhibit opened August 1 and ends today, so it’s the last day to visit these posters in the Baker Library workspace. I especially appreciate that I share this poster with my Neukom mentor at Dartmouth, Ivy Schweitzer, because together we have embraced this idea of a DH community of practice in our collaborations with each other as well as with the greater Dartmouth DH collective. Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice What is digital humanities? It is a community of practice at…

6/7 Workshop: “Wikipedagogy: Incorporating Wikipedia Editing into Your Teaching”

On Tuesday June 7, I am co-organizing, with Laura Braunstein, a one-day workshop on how to teach using Wikipedia. Our guest expert Amanda Rust, Assistant Director of the Digital Scholarship Group and Digital Humanities Librarian, Northeastern University, will lead the workshop. 9am-noon:  Introduction; theory and practice of Wikipedia editing (DCAL) Noon-1pm: Lunch (DCAL) 1-4pm: Hands-on editing practicum (Carson 61) Sign up using this link: http://libcal.dartmouth.edu/event/2594080 This workshop will introduce Wikipedia editing as a pedagogical practice that offers students the chance to participate in a live, collaborative, and globally relevant digital humanities project (en.Wikipedia.org and other Wikimedia projects) and to write and edit content…

RA Interviews: Experiential Learning and The Stainforth Project

Because I have been so lucky to employ fantastic researchers here at Dartmouth and at CU-Boulder to work on the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, Dartmouth’s Digital Humanities librarians asked me to present on experiential learning in DH. As a doctoral student, I was also paid to work on a professor’s DH projects that were underway: Laura Mandell’s Poetess Archive and The Letters of Robert Bloomfield. While I can talk about being project director and setting up the infrastructure for experiential learning, details about the outcomes of experiential learning are best gleaned from our researchers, past and present, in their…

Developing Dartmouth’s First “Intro. to Digital Humanities” Course: Syllabi and Resources

This winter, I was selected to develop and teach Dartmouth College’s first undergraduate “Introduction to Digital Humanities” course, to be called “The Humanist in the Computer: Literature, Art, and Technology” (the course name was pre-selected). It will be offered by the Comparative Literature Department in 2016-17. I have been teaching English literature courses steeped in DH methodologies and practices since 2009, but this is my first opportunity to build and teach a DH course as such, and it will also be a milestone course for the college. I polled a number of DH colleagues on social media (Facebook and Twitter) who I know have…

“Markup Theory and Practice with the TEI in ENGL 53.06 ‘Women’s Literature and Technologies of Transmission,'” 12-1:30pm, 5/26/15, Baker-Berry Library (Dartmouth)

[This lecture was sponsored by the Dartmouth Center of Advancement in Learning (DCAL) in collaboration with Dartmouth’s Digital Humanities initiative. Thank you to organizers Laura Braunstein and Scott Millspaugh for the opportunity.] Opening exercise: You each have a picture in front of you as well as some markers. Circle or mark the things in that text that you think are the most important structural and thematic aspects of it. Indicate those features using markers or colored pencils on the printed image itself. Discuss with your neighbor. I’m going to show you how this is markup. Today’s introduction is meant to…