Vignette: Mary Roberts (1788-1864), Poet Naturalist

I discovered Mary Roberts while designing the website assessment test form for the Stainforth project website. I wanted to find an author whose first and last names were common to test our database search functionality, and I wanted to use an author who I was not yet familiar with. I was drawn to the title that Stainforth held, Conchologist’s Companion (1834), since Stainforth was also a conchologist. (He became the authority on a type of mollusk such that Lovell Reeve named it after him, called Mitra Stainforthii.) I was surprised that Mary Roberts is not yet covered in Orlando since she…

Vignette: Baths of Bagnole; or the juvenile miscellany

“K1 Baths of Bagnole (The) 1826” (28.06) – I don’t recall what drew me to this entry, but I wound up researching it for long enough to figure out that it’s difficult to find. I wonder why the “Baths of Bagnole” would be the title or subject for a juvenile miscellany? Stainforth lists this title twice in his catalog: the first is the entry I quoted above, and the second is the same but for the addition of the author’s initials, E. T. W., and it does not give a shelfmark. It seems like his first entry, without the author…

Vignette: Mrs. Iliff, Poems, 2nd ed., Malta, 1818

According to our publication place data, Mrs. Iliff published Poems, Upon Several Subjects, 2nd ed., in Malta in 1818. We were very intrigued and wanted to learn more about this title and author since it’s the only one in the catalog (we know of at this time) published in Malta. http://stainforth.colorado.edu/catalog/page?page=225 We had no trouble finding this title in Google Books or Worldcat. There is even an encoded digital edition of this book in UC Davis’s British Women Romantic Poets Project http://digital.lib.ucdavis.edu/projects/bwrp/Works/ilifmpoems.htm.    The title page specifies that the work was “Printed for the Author, at the Government Printing Office, 1818”.  The…

Vignette: Elizabeth Culman (1818-1833)

While researching the more exotic publication places we mapped from Stainforth’s library catalog, we discovered that he collected a book by Elizabeth Culman (1816-1833) published in St. Petersburg, Russia.  The “Wants” portion of the catalog indicates that he wanted to collect Culman’s Works published in 1834, the year after her death. He did not cross off the title in his Wants list, which leads us to believe that he did not manage to acquire the title. This makes us feel better because we were unable to find much about the author or the title even with the help of the Internet. We could not…

Introducing the Stainforth Recovery Vignettes

This term Allyson Long, Dartmouth class of 2017 and a Neukom Scholar, completed gathering and editing publication place data for those entries in Stainforth’s catalog to which he added publication place names. There are about 1500 publication places that we were able to identify from the catalog data. (Stay tuned for updates on our results!) While collaborating, visualizing and analyzing the publication places, Allyson and I did what we usually do: explored interesting titles we found, searched for clues about authors who have left very small footprints in literary history, and shared what we learned with each other as we went….

Joining Faculty at Santa Clara University

A quick, exciting update: In the Fall of 2017, I will be joining the faculty of Santa Clara University as Assistant Professor in English specializing in British literature of the long 18th century and Digital Humanities. I am really looking forward to working with my new colleagues and students. (And Myla & Aja don’t know it yet, but in a few short months they will be California kitties!) I will continue to work as a Neukom Postdoctoral Fellow at Dartmouth College through July 31, 2017.  

Life After Print: Digital Methods for Women’s Book History @ NASSR 2017

The Book History Caucus of NASSR just accepted our panel proposal for the 2017 conference. Yahtzee! Here it is: “Life After Print: Digital Methods for Women’s Book History,” and our panel includes: Laura Mandell (Texas A&M U), co-presenters Michelle Levy and Kandice Sharren (Simon Fraser U), myself, and co-presenters Cait Coker and Kate Ozment (Texas A&M U). Here is our full abstract.

Syllabus “The Humanist in the Computer: Digital Humanities and Social Justice” COLT 18.02 (Winter 17)

Dr. Kirstyn Leuner (kirstyn.j.leuner@dartmouth.edu) New 17 Winter Course: COLT 18.02 Meets at 10A (Tues/Thurs 10:10-12:00) Office hours: TBD in Sanborn 014 course website: http://leunerwinter17.wordpress.com  The Humanist in the Computer: Digital Humanities and Social Justice Short Description: What can digital technologies do to our words? What can they do for our words, as activism? In this course, we will use computers to create, share, and analyze different kinds of digital texts in order to discover together—through, reading, writing, and entry-level programming—how our use of these technologies changes our relationship to language and politics. Desires to think, experiment, and collaborate are required;…

Romantic Circles Pedagogies Advisory Board, Ideas for Teaching w/RC Texts and Technologies

I was recently appointed to Romantic Circles’ new Pedagogies Advisory Board, a group of Romanticist digital humanists led by Kate Singer (Mt. Holyoke) and David Ruderman (OSU). The rest of our team includes Andrew Burkett (Union), Lindsey Eckert (Georgia State), myself, and Roger Whitson (WSU). We held our first Google Hangout this week to brainstorm ways to invigorate the content on the RC Pedagogies site. The Hangout was the highlight of my day, not only because I had the rare opportunity to see and chat with Romanticist colleagues I respect and adore and usually only see once or twice a…

Talk on Student-Centered Course Design in Digital Humanities Surveys for Undergrads (Matariki DH Colloquium)

I delivered this talk at the Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium, 23-25 October 2016, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario). Writing an “Introduction to Digital Humanities” Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too! Many a Digital Humanities syllabus begins with an essay by Stephen Ramsay called “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; or, What You Do With A Million Books.” I do this, too! The essay argues that we can study a culture with too many texts to read by “browsing” according to our interests and embracing serendipitous experiential learning, as if we’re wandering in the library stacks. Ramsay calls this “screwing around” or…