Talk on Student-Centered Course Design in Digital Humanities Surveys for Undergrads (Matariki DH Colloquium)

I delivered this talk at the Matariki Digital Humanities Colloquium, 23-25 October 2016, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario). Writing an “Introduction to Digital Humanities” Syllabus? You May Need to Screw Around, Too! Many a Digital Humanities syllabus begins with an essay by Stephen Ramsay called “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; or, What You Do With A Million Books.” I do this, too! The essay argues that we can study a culture with too many texts to read by “browsing” according to our interests and embracing serendipitous experiential learning, as if we’re wandering in the library stacks. Ramsay calls this “screwing around” or…

“Romantic Women Writers and The Stainforth Library: ‘Making Women Writers Count'” (NASSR 2016)

[I delivered this talk on the “Panelists, Collectors, Archivists” panel on Thursday, August 11, 2016, at NASSR. Thanks to my co-panelists Lauren Gillingham, Thomas McLean, and Marc Mazur, to our moderator Eric Gidal, and to those who made Q&A a useful and energetic discussion to kick off the conference. I hope you will respond with questions or comments.] Francis John Stainforth (1797 – 1866) was a British Anglican priest, a bibliophile, and a collector’s collector of shells, stamps, and most of all, books. He owned what we have so far found to be the largest private library of Anglophone women’s…

Stainforth Project Update, December 2014

Team Stainforth has had an extremely productive summer and fall, as we began to work collaboratively across two institutions: CU-Boulder and Dartmouth College, where I’m managing the project for my Neukom Institute postdoctoral fellowship. Follow our project blog for more frequent updates. We added two important mentors to our team, both at Dartmouth College: Professor Ivy Schweitzer, English Dept. and Women and Gender Studies, and Professor Mary Flanagan, Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities and Professor of Film and Media Studies. I also want to thank Professor Dan Rockmore, Director of the Institute, and the Neukom staff who have…

Digital Crucible Presentation, Oct. 6-7 (Dartmouth College)

I recently presented a talk at the Digital Crucible conference at Dartmouth College, Oct 6-7, 2014. Here is my original abstract as a placeholder. In the near future, I will post a revised and updated version of the talk I delivered, along with my slides. I am in the process of making revisions to account from some very helpful feedback I received from conference participants. Special thanks to Amanda French, Kelli Towers Jasper, Dan Shore, Ivy Schweitzer, and Tom Luxon for your responses and questions. Original title: 19th-c. Library Catalogs & Stainforth’s Feminist Archive of Women’s Writing Abstract: My talk…

Stainforth Library of Women Writers Exhibit at MLA 2014, in Inside Higher Ed

Here is a link to the digital exhibit I made for the recent presentation at MLA on Saturday, December 11, “Digital Humanities from the Ground Up” (session 528). Click on the image of our TOC to go there: The Stainforth exhibit at MLA appeared in an Inside Higher Ed article that covered recent Digital Humanities sessions at MLA14, held in Chicago this past weekend. Clearly, I should have tattooed our project URL to my right arm. Stainforth demo at MLA in Inside Higher Ed The article covers the diverse content and popularity of DH sessions at this year’s MLA, and…

The Stainforth Database: Re-Collecting a 19th-Century Library of Women’s Writing

[Presented by invitation on the CU faculty panel, dh+CU Symposium, CU-Boulder, August 22, 2013] In his keynote this morning, Trevor Muñoz mentioned the importance of Digital Humanists working in teams. Today, I am presenting on behalf of Team Stainforth, which includes: Deborah Hollis in Special Collections, Holley Long of CU Libraries, myself in the English Department, Elizabeth Newsom with CU Libraries, and the support and enthusiasm of Special Collections colleagues Amanda Brown, Susan Guinn-Chipman, Chris Levine, Greg Robl, and past and present students who have helped us with scanning and transcribing. We really are an excited team. Specifically, we’re passionate…

“A Large Amount of Good Second-Class Work”: The Value of Graduate Students’ Contributions to Scholarly Group Blogs

MLA 2013 Talk delivered in “Rewards and Challenges of Serial Scholarship” (Session 767), January 6, 2013. Also featured as an “Editors’ Choice” from MLA13 in Digital Humanities Now. A roundtable organized and chaired by Mark Sample (GMU), with co-panelists Douglas M. Armato, Univ. of Minnesota Press; Kathleen Fitzpatrick, MLA; Frank Kelleter, Univ. of Göttingen; Jason Mittell, Middlebury Coll.; Ted Underwood, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ——————————————– John Franklin Jameson, an early director of the American Historical Society in the late nineteenth-century, wanted to connect scholars in the same discipline across institutions and to encourage scholarship by those who were not yet…

Metadata and Digital Pedagogy: Surfacing Romantic-Era Book Histories with Captions

[Note: This talk, “Metadata and Digital Pedagogy: Surfacing Romantic-era Book Histories with Captions,” is part of the panel called “Communicating Book Histories with Metadata” with Lindsey Eckert (Toronto) and Laura Mandell (Texas A&M). Presented at HASTAC V, Ann Arbor (U Mich), Dec. 1-3, 2011. Find the slides here: Kirstyn HASTAC2011 PPT. Find Karen Petruska’s generous review of our panel here.] — In Andrew Piper’s influential work Dreaming in Books, he singles out the romantic era—which roughly spans the years between 1770 and 1840—as an especially bibliographic moment in Western print culture history. In his introduction, he says, While books had…

Defanging Ann Radcliffe’s “Salisbury Plains”: The Unexplained Supernatural, Myth, and History

[Paper delivered at NASSR 2011, “Romanticism and Independence,” Park City, Utah, August 11-14, 2011. This paper is an early iteration of a larger essay in progress on Ann Radcliffe and her use of history. ] —– Whose were the hands, that upheaved these stones Standing, like specters, under the moon, Steadfast and solemn and strange and alone, As raised by a Wizard—a king of bones! And whose was the mind, that willed them reign, The wonder of ages, simply sublime? The purpose is lost in the midnight of time; And shadowy guessings alone remain. (I.1-8) Ann Radcliffe’s poem “Salisbury Plains”…