Guest lecturing @ SJSU, #bigger6 graduate seminar, with activities

Last evening, I had the pleasure of guest lecturing in Prof. Katherine D. Harris’s graduate seminar, “#Bigger6: Decolonizing British Romantic Literature (1775-1835) through Print Culture” (ENGL 232), from 7-8:30pm. My presentation had two parts. First, I gave a 45-minute lecture on the Stainforth library and its potential as #bigger6 activism, or the broadening of the scope of Romanticism beyond the study of the same 6-ish white male writers (John Keats, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, George Gordon Byron, Percy Shelley, William Blake, plus Sir Walter Scott, etc.). After this, I led a 30-minute exploration of DH project planning and management….

RA Interviews: Experiential Learning and The Stainforth Project

Because I have been so lucky to employ fantastic researchers here at Dartmouth and at CU-Boulder to work on the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, Dartmouth’s Digital Humanities librarians asked me to present on experiential learning in DH. As a doctoral student, I was also paid to work on a professor’s DH projects that were underway: Laura Mandell’s Poetess Archive and The Letters of Robert Bloomfield. While I can talk about being project director and setting up the infrastructure for experiential learning, details about the outcomes of experiential learning are best gleaned from our researchers, past and present, in their…

“Whither Are We Bound: Romanticism in the Digital Age,” 2016 Whalley Lecture (Queen’s U)

[I delivered the Annual Whalley Lecture on March 11, 2016, at Queen’s University. All the links I mentioned in my talk can be found here in order of mention. Once more, I would like to thank Shelley King, Brooke Cameron, John Pierce, and the entire Queen’s English Department for this opportunity and a wonderful visit.] You may recognize the first part of my title since the Open Syllabus Project tells us that Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein appears on more syllabi than any other work of English literature. For those who may not recall Frankenstein, it begins with Captain Walton’s sea voyage…

Delivering the Annual Whalley Lecture, 3/11/16, Queen’s University

Next Friday, March 11, I will be at Queen’s University to deliver the Annual Whalley Lecture: “Whither Are We Bound: Romanticism in the Digital Age.” My talk will explore literary experimentation in the Romantic era as well as in Romantic digital humanities projects. I am really looking forward to this event! (poster credit: Brooke Cameron)

Upcoming Public Lecture 2/18/16, “The Textual Diorama in the Romantic Era: Writing Virtual Ruins”

In 1822-23, a large-scale, theatrical painting show called the Diorama, invented by Louis Daguerre and Charles Bouton, debuted in Paris and London, and it riveted audiences with the recent inventions of realistic 3D illusions and animation. The sensational Diorama inspired authors and artists to invent new forms of storytelling. Building on an emerging body of critical theory and analysis that grapples with non-teleological histories of “old” media, Dr. Leuner identifies a group of authors in the early 19th century who respond to the novelty and special effects of the Diorama by trying to translate these shows into text to enliven…

The Digital Humanities for Lunch, with the Stainforth Team – 11/16, noon, M210 Norlin Library, CU-Boulder

Please join us! The Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing project team will be holding a brown-bag lunch on Monday, November 16th, at noon, in Norlin M210. We are a digital humanities group building an electronic edition of Francis Stainforth’s 19th-century private library–the largest private library of women’s writing in the 19th century. This is a great time to chat and ask questions about the digital humanities in general as well specifics about how this very large-scale textual digitization project is progressing. We will also discuss our progress thanks to the Innovative Seed Grant funding that we won for 2015-16. The Stainforth project…

“Markup Theory and Practice with the TEI in ENGL 53.06 ‘Women’s Literature and Technologies of Transmission,'” 12-1:30pm, 5/26/15, Baker-Berry Library (Dartmouth)

[This lecture was sponsored by the Dartmouth Center of Advancement in Learning (DCAL) in collaboration with Dartmouth’s Digital Humanities initiative. Thank you to organizers Laura Braunstein and Scott Millspaugh for the opportunity.] Opening exercise: You each have a picture in front of you as well as some markers. Circle or mark the things in that text that you think are the most important structural and thematic aspects of it. Indicate those features using markers or colored pencils on the printed image itself. Discuss with your neighbor. I’m going to show you how this is markup. Today’s introduction is meant to…

“Making Data for Now with the Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing,” Invited Guest Lecture 4-7-15, 9-10:30am, Baker-Berry Library (Dartmouth College)

[I was invited to deliver the inaugural talk in a series hosted for Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth College. Many thanks to Laura Braunstein for organizing the event and to those who attended. And special thanks to my collaborators at CU Libraries, Deborah Hollis and Holley Long, for their continued support and teamwork.] Textual digitization projects of a large scale can take a long time. As you know, they take an even longer time when the text cannot be scanned and OCR’d and manuscript transcription is required. Today I want to take advantage of this middle stage of a long-term textual…

The Stainforth Digital Library Under Construction, for the Arts & Humanities Resource Center “Gear Up” 2015 (Dartmouth 1-22-15) | The Stainforth Library of Women Writers

A recent post I published on the Stainforth project blog regarding my presentation at Dartmouth’s “Gear Up” event last week. I presented vast quantities of raw transcription — dirty data — as well as some of our processes, tools, and goals. The Stainforth Digital Library Under Construction, for the Arts & Humanities Resource Center “Gear Up” 2015 (Dartmouth 1-22-15) | The Stainforth Library of Women Writers.

Stainforth Project Introductory Presentation, Neukom Institute Event, 20 October 2014

[Reblogged from http://libpress.colorado.edu/stainforth, a short invited talk on 20 October 2014, delivered at the Hanover Inn, Dartmouth College, for the 2014 Neukom Institute dinner. ] My Neukom postdoctoral project here at Dartmouth creates a digital model of Francis John Stainforth’s library, which was an actual private library in London collected in the 19th century that contains only books by women who were writing poetry and plays – some of the most popular genres of the day. What makes this library special is that it was the largest library of books by women writers that we have a record of from…